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Friday, May 19 • 3:00pm - 4:15pm
Genome Engineering: The Next Genomic Revolution

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The Genomic Revolution of the last 20 years has provided us with a wealth of information about what our genomes are – the sequence of our genomes, how differences in our genomes relate to differences between each other, and how these differences relate to health and disease. The future is about what our genomes could be. New technologies – such as the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing system – have enabled the precise modification of genome sequences in ways never before imagined possible. The presentation will discuss how this technology was recently discovered and how it is already being applied to attacking cancer and eliminating devastating genetic diseases. We will look into the future to how this technology could further be applied to manipulate genome structure and function for reprogramming biological systems to facilitate disease modeling and drug development. Finally, broader implications of the implementation of these technologies will be discussed.

 


Program Themes
avatar for Transhumanism

Transhumanism

Evolution has been a slow natural process that we are externalizing and accelerating through technology and creativity. Humans have long sought to transform nature with agriculture and medicine, employing biotechnologies to manipulate living systems, and even our own bodies. Toda... Read More →

Talent
avatar for Charlie Gersbach

Charlie Gersbach

Dr. Charles A. Gersbach is the Rooney Family Associate Professor at Duke University in the Departments of Biomedical Engineering and Orthopaedic Surgery, an Investigator in the Duke Center for Genomic and Computational Biology, and Director of the Duke Center for Biomolecular and... Read More →

Program Partners
avatar for Duke University

Duke University

Duke University is an American private research university located in Durham, North Carolina. At Moogfest 2017, we will be joined by professors Mark Kruse, Bill Seaman, John Supko, Charlie Gerbach, Miguel Nicolelis, Scott Lindroth, and Katherine Hayles.



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